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[Report] Traditional Culture and Karimoku Furniture in A Spacious Kyoto-Style Machiya Townhouse

See & Do

adaptive_reuse

[Report] Traditional Culture and Karimoku Furniture in A Spacious Kyoto-Style Machiya Townhouse

Kyo no Ondokoro is a brand of accommodations renovated from a Kyoto-style machiya townhouse, which is operated by Wacoal Corporation. Kyo no Ondokoro Fuyacho-Nijo opened in the area south of Kyoto Imperial Palace in March 2019, marking the fourth location of the brand. In a space where good old machiya townhouses and modern art coexist, you can enjoy the old capital as if you lived here. Here are information on a machiya townhouse inn where you can encounter traditional Japanese culture.

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We are travel web magazine run by Ikkyu.com known for its "Let's make luxury ourselves.". Our editorial staff carefully selected this wonderful travel information.

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We are travel web magazine run by Ikkyu.com known for its "Let's make luxury ourselves.". Our editorial staff carefully selected this wonderful travel information.

Kyo no Ondokoro Fuyacho-Nijo is located to the south of Kyoto Imperial Palace. Located in an area with convenient access to everywhere you’ll want to go, this inn is the perfect starting point for sightseeing in the city. This renovated, approximately 150-year-old Kyoto-style machiya townhouse features works of art and Karimoku furniture made by skilled craftsmen using carefully selected materials. 

A good old machiya townhouse space with Karimoku furniture and art

Just beyond the entrance, guests will find a traditional Japanese room containing a nijiriguchi door (small doorway unique to a tea-ceremony room) and a sunken hearth. (The hearth is only used for events.)
In the corridors and throughout the building, you’ll find floors made with naguri craftsmanship. The floors are defined by their unique, bumpy texture that is pleasant to walk over barefoot. 
The rooms are arranged to create a narrow but deep space unique to Kyoto-style machiya townhouses in a style known as the “eel’s bed.” The inn makes use of the preserved original structure of the townhouse. For a refreshing sense of release, guests can open the large window in the back to let in the wind. 
From the Japanese-style room with a sunken kotatsu table, you can gaze at the garden that lies beyond the porch. A Karimoku table made of elegantly colored cherry wood is placed in the middle of the room. The table is designed to bring out the beautiful pale grain found in the cross-section of the wood which is called shirata in Japan. The table was specially made to fit the room, and underneath it is a sunken kotatsu to provide warmth even in the cold seasons.
The lighting fixtures, made with fine bamboo work. The soft light that filters through the gaps in the bamboo produces a sense of calm in the Japanese-style room. 
The artwork that decorates the alcove is made by the Shigaraki-yaki potter Keiko Masumoto. The piece resembling a pine tree is also made with pottery, forming the tree and the plate together in one. The artist is known for designs that combine artistry with practical items such as pots and plates.
In the dining area, the large round table and the wallpaper catch your eye. The beautiful grain is brought out in the walnut wood table, and the round shape makes it so nobody is sitting at the end. This table is also an example of Karimoku furniture. The edges and legs are rounded to be pleasant to the touch.
The light green wallpaper that accents the wall is made at the Noda Print Motif Workshop, which is known for its printed paper artwork. If you look closely, you’ll spot the conch shell pattern on the paper. The conch shell signifies the succession of past to future. The paper was made to represent the concept of passing down the Kyoto-style machiya townhouse to the next generation. 
Next to the dining area is a spacious kitchen with an area equal to approximately six tatami mats (approximately 9.72 square meters). The texture of the wood creates a sense of warmth and the walls are accented with wave-like patterns.
The kitchen utensils and cutlery are stylish yet functional, and the kitchen is equipped with all the cookware necessary to make a proper meal.
The kitchen includes characteristic features such as a cooking stove (okudosan), a trace of the old Kyoto-style machiya townhouse, as well as a traditional hibukuro vent that allows steam to escape. The space is finished to perfection, with the state-of-the-art and the old existing in harmony. 
Lined up above the cooking stove are statuettes called hotei-san. These statuettes belonged to the townhouse before it became an inn. They represent spirits of the cooking space and it is customary to line them up above the stove. These seven statuettes of different sizes arranged together are an adorable addition to the kitchen.

A spacious bathroom for two

Opening the door at the back of the kitchen reveals the bathroom that lies beyond the spacious dressing room. This space, which can accommodate a group of people at once, is complete with two Shigaraki-yaki ware sinks along with plenty of toiletries. 
This is the view from the bathtub. There are two showers and plenty of room in the shigaraki tub. The bathroom becomes a semi-open-air space when the large window that looks over the garden is opened. There are blinds for those who prefer an extra sense of privacy while they bathe.

Two bedrooms and a tasteful library space

Now, onto the bedrooms which are located on the second floor. At the top of the stairs is a space that connects the bedrooms on the left and on the right. The big sofa is perfect for relaxing before bed.
Behind the sofa is an opening to the hibukuro vent. From here, you can look down at the kitchen on the first floor. 
There are two bedrooms on the second floor, each equipped with two beds. If more sleeping space is necessary, guests can lay out a futon mattress in the Japanese-style room on the first floor. Across the ceiling remain black beams from the building’s machiya townhouse days. 
We recommend spending some time relaxing with a book of your choice in the bedroom’s library space. The padded walls are a great feature, offering a comfortable feel for you to lean your back against the wall while reading your book. The colors of the walls, the cushions, and other interior elements give the room extra hints of charm.
The bookshelves are lined with books of various genres, including novels, picture books, and photo collections. There are also books in English and Chinese, so guests from all around the world can find something to enjoy.
A comfortable stay at Kyo no Ondokoro Fuyacho Nijo offers you a taste of life in Kyoto. An abundance of traces of the olden days remains in this renovated building. Spend some time getting in touch with traditional culture in this townhouse inn complete with a refined selection of tasteful furniture and art.
Address
1st Floor of Wacoal New Kyoto Bldg., 6 Kitanouchi-cho, Nishikujo, Minami-ku, Kyoto
Website
https://www.kyo-ondokoro.kyoto/en/

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We are travel web magazine run by Ikkyu.com known for its "Let's make luxury ourselves.". Our editorial staff carefully selected this wonderful travel information.