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Temples & Shrines

Ninna-ji Temple

Ninna-ji Temple has it all - an exquisite five-story pagoda, a massive main gate, delightful landscape gardens (with ponds, bridges, and old stones), raked gravel gardens, teahouses, and beautiful halls for prayer and residence. It is famous for its late-blooming cherry trees which draw hosts of admirers every year. It is a grand example of the natural harmony which marks so many Japanese Buddhist temples.
 
Originally a summer home for the Imperial Family, which sought to escape the summer heat of the centrally located palace, it was founded as a temple in 886 by the Emperor Koko, who died a year after. The Emperor Uda, who became its first head priest, completed the temple in 888. Afterwards, it became tradition for a member of the Imperial Family to act as head priest, a custom which lasted until 1867, when the Imperial household moved to Tokyo.
 
Ninna-ji Temple is a large complex, and one can happily spend several hours exploring the grounds and the priceless cultural artifacts in its treasure house Reiho-kan Hall.

Temples & Shrines

Ninna-ji Temple

Ninna-ji Temple has it all - an exquisite five-story pagoda, a massive main gate, delightful landscape gardens (with ponds, bridges, and old stones), raked gravel gardens, teahouses, and beautiful halls for prayer and residence. It is famous for its late-blooming cherry trees which draw hosts of admirers every year. It is a grand example of the natural harmony which marks so many Japanese Buddhist temples.
 
Originally a summer home for the Imperial Family, which sought to escape the summer heat of the centrally located palace, it was founded as a temple in 886 by the Emperor Koko, who died a year after. The Emperor Uda, who became its first head priest, completed the temple in 888. Afterwards, it became tradition for a member of the Imperial Family to act as head priest, a custom which lasted until 1867, when the Imperial household moved to Tokyo.
 
Ninna-ji Temple is a large complex, and one can happily spend several hours exploring the grounds and the priceless cultural artifacts in its treasure house Reiho-kan Hall.
Address
33 Omuro-dairi, Ukyo-ku, Kyoto City
Tel
+81-75-461-1155
Fax
+81-75-464-4070
Website
http://www.ninnaji.jp/en/
Access: 15-minute walk from JR Hanazono Station on the JR Sagano Line
2-minute walk from Omuro-Ninnaji Station on the Randen Kitano Line
City Bus Stop Omuro-Ninnaji
 
Open year round
 
Hours: 9:00 - 17:00 (Mar to Nov.), 9:00 - 16:30 (Dec. to Feb.)
Reiho-kan Hall: 9:00 - 16:30 Open only Apr. to 4th Sunday of May, and Oct. to Nov. 23.
 
Entrance fees: Adults: 500 yen,Junior High and Elementary School Students: 300 yen
Reiho-kan Hall: Adults: 500 yen, High School Students and below: free

Parking: Cars 500 yen, Microbuses and Buses 2,000 yen (Parking is only available during visit)

Wheelchair accessible: Yes (Assistance for wheelchair users available upon prior request)