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and more about getting the most out of your experience in the City of Kyoto!

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Kyoto Souvenirs You Can't Leave Without!

Take a piece of Kyoto home with you.

In Japan, bringing home souvenirs, or “omiyage” from a trip is a cultural tradition—for yourself, and for others to enjoy, too. For Japanese people, “omiyage” often means food products: Japanese sweets, snacks, tea, or even pickled vegetables. But there are plenty of other options for Kyoto souvenirs, too.

Shopping Like a Local: Popular Kyoto Souvenirs & Gifts

Tsukemono

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“Tsukemono” are Japanese pickled vegetables—like the pickled ginger that often accompanies sushi. Kyoto is known for its “kyo yasai” vegetables, but with pickled tsukemono, you won’t have to worry about them spoiling when you take them home! Traditionally, tsukemono is served as a side dish to accompany rice.

Find tsukemono at:

Kyo-Tsukemono Daiyasu

Doishibazuke Honpo

Kyo-Tsukemono Mori

Masugo

For even more locations to buy tsukemono throughout Kyoto, click here.

“Kyo-gashi” Japanese Sweets

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Kyoto is practically overflowing with different varieties of traditional Japanese sweets, from the more familiar—softer, more cookie-like confections—to delicate, art-like treats.

One traditional variety is goshikimame—literally, “five-colored beans,” which are made from sugar-coated beans. True to their name, they are made in five different colors, and are easy to package as a gift. You can find goshikimame at shops like Mamemasa.

For more shops where you can purchase many more varieties of traditional Japanese sweets in Kyoto, click here.

Tea

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Tea has an extremely rich tradition in Kyoto–it was first cultivated in Japan in Kyoto’s northern Takao region! Japanese green tea also makes an extremely elegant (and delicious) souvenir, and makes for lightweight packing. You can purchase some matcha powder or loose tea leaves from many locations throughout the city, including the centrally-located Fukujuen Kyoto Flagship Store. Japanese tea comes in many varieties, so it’s a good idea to ask the staff about your options.

Even More Kyoto Souvenirs!

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Kyoto shopping of course offers opportunities to take home a piece of the Ancient Capital that you won’t be eating later. The following are also incredibly unique Kyoto souvenirs that you’ll be able to use and admire long after returning home.

Kyoto Pottery: Kiyomizu-yaki

How about a Japanese teapot for your tea? Kyoto ceramics are highly regarded for their beauty and quality, not least of which Kiyomizu-yaki pottery, which is produced in Kyoto’s Yamashina area. Kiyomizu-yaki pottery is available in a wide spectrum of designs and colors, many of which are unique to specific kilns.

You can shop for Kyoto pottery at:

Asahi-do

Gallery Rakuchu Rakugai

Kyoto Unraku-gama

Japanese Cooking Knives

Buy Japanese cooking knives while you’re in Kyoto to bring back some of the flavors of Japan in your own kitchen. Japanese cooking knives come in many shapes—some of them engravable—and some Kyoto cutlery shops have been in business for many generations.

Find Japanese cutlery at:

Kikuchimonji

Woodblock Prints

An ukiyo-e or other Kyoto woodblock print makes a wonderful souvenir, and is also fun to search for in the back shelves of little bookstores!

Look for woodblock prints at:

Unsodo

Kyoto Handicraft Center

Folding Fans

Kyoto’s folding fans, also known as Kyo-sensu, make for an excellent gift because they are lightweight and compact, but unfold to display the magnificent craft of this ancient city.

Find folding fans at:

Kyosendo

Maisendo

Hakuchikudo

For even more shopping in Kyoto, search for stores here!